Vermont businesses struggle to fill available summer jobs

With school out and most college classes wrapped up, now may be the time to find that summer concert. The options are endless this season, like the life jacket. “This year has been completely different, it’s really phenomenal, whereas at our pool, we normally have staff that come back year after year,” Paul Coats, director of arts, parks and recreation for Lebanon. said. “Most of the staff that we’ve had for the last couple of years are now in their professional jobs, they’re getting internships and full-time, year-round jobs.” At the public pool in Lebanon they are ready for summer. . But it wasn’t easy to find everyone. “We have eight guards now, which gives us the full staff, but the eight guards are new staff,” Coasts said. “Usually in a pool you want some veterans working alongside the new guards, this year we don’t have that.” We start our season with 40 shooting guards. And we’re down to 21 for the summer,” said Ashley Ellis, director of aquatic activities for UVAC. “Other pools are opening for the first time since COVID and other guards are going outside.” The number of guards is affecting his hours. And if you want to jump in the pool, you’ll need a reservation. “We are working very hard to make sure we are fully staffed at all times so everyone here at UVAC is safe,” Ellis said. They have been able to find enough staff to run their summer programs. However, having fun while working is a huge draw for applicants. “I had a lot of friends who were miserable doing their summer jobs, and I was looking for something to have fun with,” Alessandra Cimis, UVAC Splash Camp counselor. she said. “And able to be active and social and I’ve always loved working with children.” Food service jobs can also be difficult to fill. For example, ice cream parlors have trouble finding employees to serve ice cream. “We used to have loads of applications here and we’ve never had any problems, and this is our 25th season,” Meredith Johnson, co-owner of Ice Crema Fore-U said. “But this year, the apps are a little bit smaller and the availability of the apps is a bit smaller. You know, people want to work fewer and fewer hours.” At Fore-U they had to open later than usual, but they are trying to be flexible with hours and schedules. All in the hope that customers will come back for more. “I think our lines are extremely long and we’re very appreciative that people are willing to wait in them,” Johnson said. “Usually we have five to seven people, they move pretty fast I think.”

With school out and most college classes wrapped up, now may be the time to find that summer concert. The options are endless this season, like the lifeguard.

“This year has been completely different, it’s really phenomenal, whereas at our pool, we normally have staff that come back year after year,” said Paul Coats, Lebanon’s director of arts, parks and recreation. “Most of the staff that we’ve had for the last couple of years are now in their career job, they’re getting internships and full-time, year-round jobs.”

At the public pool in Lebanon they are ready for summer. But it wasn’t easy to find everyone.

“We have eight guards now, which gives us the full staff, but the eight guards are new staff,” Coasts said. “Usually in a group you want some veterans working alongside the new guards, this year we don’t have that.”

At the Upper Valley Aquatic Center, they offer free lifeguard training for new guards who want to work there.

“We started our season with 40 shooting guards. And we’re down to 21 for the summer,” said Ashley Ellis, director of aquatic activities for UVAC. “Other pools are opening for the first time since COVID and other guards going outside.”

The number of guards is affecting their schedules. And if you want to jump in the pool you will need a reservation.

“We are working hard to make sure we are fully staffed at all times so that everyone here at UVAC is safe,” Ellis said.

They have been able to find enough staff to run their summer programs. However, having fun while working is a huge draw for applicants.

“I had a lot of friends who were miserable doing their summer jobs, and I was looking for something to have fun with,” said Alessandra Cimis, UVAC Splash Camp counselor. “And able to be active and social and I’ve always loved working with children.”

Food service jobs can also be difficult to fill. For example, ice cream parlors have trouble finding employees to serve ice cream.

“We used to have app stacks here and have never had any issues, and this is our 25the season,” said Meredith Johnson, co-owner of Ice Cream Fore-U. “But this year, the apps are a little bit smaller and the availability of the apps is a bit smaller. You know, people want to work fewer and fewer hours.”

In Fore-U they have had to open later than usual but they are trying to be flexible with hours and hours. All in the hope that customers will come back for more.

“I think our lines are extremely long and we’re very appreciative that people are willing to wait in them,” Johnson said. “Usually we have five to seven people, they move pretty fast I think.”

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